What I Learned About Animal Time Solo Hiking 3,000 Miles

Author Jeff Posey at Penasco Blanco Chaco Canyon National Historic Park. Photo by Jason Myers.

Animal Time vs. Human Time On the third day, seconds and minutes and hours are meaningless. On the fifth day, now is the only moment, and time is marked by a soft droning hum like the subliminal base notes of a wide and deep river. This is animal time, as distinct from human time as…

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Chaco Canyon Peñasco Blanco Trail: Double Anasazi Payoff

Chaco Canyon’s Peñasco Blanco Trail: Double Anasazi Payoff Author Note by Jeff Posey

A Double Anasazi Payoff: Chaco Canyon’s Peñasco Blanco Trail. First, the infamous Supernova Pictograph. Second, a skybox view of downtown Chaco.

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Anasazi North Towns: Aztec and Salmon

Anasazi North Towns: Aztec and Salmon; Author Note by Jeff Posey

In the late 1000s, two huge Anasazi north towns popped up along the San Juan and Animas rivers. Why? Answers abound, both factual and fanciful. Either way, the drama is intense!

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Memoir of a Rookie Anasazi Potter

Anasazi Potter Author Note by Jeff Posey Feature Image from Anasazi Potter Workshop by Gregory S. Wood, ArchæoCeramist, at Chimney Rock National Monument near Pagosa Springs, Colorado

A few summers ago, I had the incredible experience of a three-day Anasazi pottery workshop taught by Gregory S. Wood, ArchæoCeramist, at Chimney Rock National Monument near Pagosa Springs, Colorado.

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Anasazi Runners and the Two-Hour Marathon

Anasazi Runners and the Two-Hour Marathon Author Note by Jeff Posey

In the high Sierra Madre Occidental mountains of northwestern Mexico live a tribe descended from the Mogollon People, neighbors of the Anasazi. Today they live in conditions close to those of the Native Americans in the Four Corners region prior to the arrival of Europeans and their horses. The men call themselves rarámuri, which means “foot runners,” or “light feet.” The Spanish named them the Tarahumara. They are the best living examples and metaphors for Anasazi runners, the couriers and traders and emissaries that were the fiber-optic cables of their information age across their far-flung empire. Could they arrive at a major marathon event someday and break the magical two-hour barrier? It is not only possible, it’s the proposition of my novel, Anasazi Runner: a novel of identity and speed.

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Pagosa 2015 Snapshots and Notes

Welcome to Pagosa Springs, Colorado!

Short travelogue and snapshots of Danielle and Jeff Posey’s travels to Pagosa Springs, Colorado, with friends Mike and Vicki. Pagosa Springs is home to the world’s deepest hot springs, and is twenty miles west of Chimney Rock National Monument, my historical fictional home base of the Twins in The Last Skywatcher Series by Jeff Posey.

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Anasazi Collapse and Modern Income Inequality

Anasazi Collapse and Modern Income Inequality Author Note by Jeff Posey

The Anasazi, and most other cultures that collapsed, did so for a combination of reasons: climate change (drought), human-caused environmental degradation, overpopulation, new religious fervor, and, finally too much wealth inequality. We already know climate is changing and that we humans are degrading our global environment, and that our global population is growing rapidly. Is increasing wealth and income inequality another leading indicator of our own collapse? Can we avoid it? This is the final capstone of research that propelled me to write Price on Their Heads: A Novel of Income Inequality and Mayhem.

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Anasazi Rich: Kings, Commoners, and Collapse

Anasazi Rich: Kings, Commoners, and Collapse Author Note by Jeff Posey

Did the Anasazi rich elite cause the collapse of the Chaco Canyon Anasazi culture? They certainly contributed in ways that could be an early warning for our modern culture. This is background research for Price on Their Heads: A Novel of Income Inequality and Mayhem by Jeff Posey.

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Why Did the Anasazi Collapse?

Why Did the Anasazi Collapse Author Note by Jeff Posey

Why did the Anasazi Collapse? A combination of climate change (drought), environmental degradation, too much wealth inequality, and perhaps a new religion.

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Were the Anasazi Cannibals?

Were the Anasazi Cannibals? Author Note by Jeff Posey

In the annals of human history, the accusation of cannibalism is one of the most demeaning. But the Anasazi, it seems, were. Or at least there is strong evidence that they, at times, practiced cannibalism.

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